Matt Carberry (kingpin248) wrote,
Matt Carberry
kingpin248

Googly-oogly

I returned home from a fun night out nearly two weeks ago to a Google Reader page that showed a sad alert message -- telling me that Reader would be retired on July 1. NOOOOO! I love Reader, as it puts personal blogs and stories from favorite sites and authors in a convenient place and format. I'm not sure what I'm going to do about this; my inclination is to wait and see what happens with Feeddler, the iOS Reader client I use on my iPhone and iPad. In fact, it seems that a plan for a post-Reader Feeddler is in the works. I have nothing but praise for Feeddler's user interface, so I'm inclined to stick with it after Reader goes by the wayside. Of note today: an article at All Things D hinting that Google can't afford (from a liability standpoint) to have Reader off all by itself, without a dedicated team behind it -- you know, one that includes lawyers.

As an alternative, I can actually now just open everything I might want to read in tabs on my browser. My Twitter feed alerted me to the OneTab extension for Chrome, which, with a single mouse click, turns all your open tabs into a single tab with a list of links. OneTab touts the memory reduction in the browser; while this is a positive effect, I'm not experiencing it fully because tabs that are "pinned" in Chrome are unaffected. However, from a usability standpoint, this isn't a bug, it's a feature -- the whole point of pinned tabs is they're the ones that remain open under all conditions, so I can use OneTab without having to worry about re-opening each pinned tab individually.

Also via Twitter: Ars Technica reports that Google is retiring site blocking in its search functionality. The only way to not "welcome back the content farms," as AT puts it, is to install a Chrome extension, which is of no help to anyone who doesn't use Chrome. I've never blocked sites from Google search, so this doesn't affect me personally, but it caught my attention because Libby's tweet called it another step in "[t]he great Google Web Enclosening." I regard enclosure of the Internet, regardless of who is doing it, as a negative; so much of the utility provided by it derives from the Internet's lack of barriers and its ability to circumvent those that are erected.
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